I love old Tektronix analog oscilloscopes and I could not seem get enough of them. So when I saw a cheap “untested, unknown working condition” Tektronix 2213 listed on eBay recently, I just could not resist the temptation to grab it.

Unlike the Tektronix 2445 I got earlier, Tektronix 2213 is a no-frills basic 2 channel 60MHz bandwidth scope with limited delayed time base capability, and thus is pretty easy to service. (manuals can be found here).

Here is a picture of the Tektronix 2213 I received (by the way, it is actually fully functional):

Textronix 2213
Textronix 2213

The cover slides off after removing a few screws on the back and side. The layout is pretty straightforward and everything except for the HV circuitry is readily accessible. Note the delay line wrapped neatly around the neck of the CRT. In 2213, the sweep delay time can be chosen from three discrete values (whereas in 2215 the sweep delay can be adjusted continuously), in most situations, this is more than adequate. Unlike on a much higher end 2245 where the intensified zone and the magnified delayed sweep can be seen simultaneously on two separate traces, you can only see either the intensified zone or the magnified trace on this scope.

Topview
Topview
Channel 1 & 2
Channel 1 & 2

Here are a couple more pictures showing the CRT and its supporting circuitry from the side:

CRT Side View
CRT Side View
Side Adjustment
Side Adjustment

And here is a picture showing the other side:

Side View
Side View

Tektronix 2213 uses a switching power supply which is enclosed within the metal casing towards the end. I had originally planed to open it up to take a closer look at the power supply circuitry, but it turned out to be a bit trickier to do than I had thought after reading the manual so I decided to leave it alone.

The following picture shows the bottom side. Because of the high voltages involved, the designers made sure to properly cover all high voltage areas one could accidentally touch during servicing.

Bottom PCB
Bottom PCB

These couple of pictures reveal the entire PCB after the high voltage shielding was removed. The picture to the right is a close up of the HV section. Yes, it could be lethal when dealing with such high voltages. So please heed the warnings.

Bottom PCB (HV Shield Removed)
Bottom PCB (HV Shield Removed)
Bottom PCB (HV)
Bottom PCB (HV)

The rise time of this scope, according to the manual is less than 5.8 ns (0.35/BW). Using the avalanche pulse generator I built earlier, the measured rise time seems to be consistent with the specification. The following picture was taken using the fastest sweep speed (0.05 us) and the x10 switch pulled up, this configuration is equivalent of a sweep speed of 5ns/div. So the measured rise time is just under 5 ns.

Rise Time Measurement
Rise Time Measurement
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8 Thoughts on “Tektronix 2213 Teardown Pictures”

  • My college lab has Instek GOS-630FC which has frequency readout display and encoder knobs. It’s a 30Mhz Scope and costs around 500$. Can’t believ that this 80s scope has higher bandwidth and rise time than the Instek(5.8 ns vs 11.7ns). Trying to score a refurbished working 2213 for around 100$ here in India. Good scope for beginners right? How much did you get it for?

    • Hi Ayush,
      Where in India?I am also looking for some old Tek/Tekhind scopes in India.I have a 2215A which just conked out,still trying to fix it :-).
      Thomas

  • Hi,
    to repair an Tektronix-2213 i’m searching for the Votls/Div Switches – any idea where i can get some?
    many thanks
    Tom

  • I bought my 2213A brand new from Tektronix back in 1985. If I remember right, I think I paid $1,200 for it. I’ve done some work as an electronic technician. At home I like to design, build and test simple transistor circuits. I keep my 2213A in mint condition. I cover it with a towel to keep dust off of it when not in use. I dream of getting a main frame Tektronix 7000 series oscilloscope, but I know in reality such a scope would be beyond my limitations. The new flat panel scopes seem lifeless and no fun. When I’m working on a circuit, a real cathode ray oscilloscope (at least) makes me feel like a scientist. Cool equipment make the hobby more fun.

  • I picked up a 2213 “for parts not working” from an Ebay seller for $30 plus S/H recently. When it arrived I was shocked when I extracted it from the shipping box and protection the seller had put around it. It was in mint condition, looked like brand new!!!
    He even threw in a power cord, so plugged it on switched on, and a further shock!! It works perfectly, both channels, clean traces. Checked it out on an RF generator and cannot fault it…30 bucks well spent.
    Some weeks back I bought a 2465 for parts to rebuild another 2465. It was listed as not working, will boot up with an error message… Powered it up, sure an error message appeared, resets and the scope works perfectly, now I need a none working donor to rebuild the one that this working one was for… Cost??? $112 plus S/H, another bargain!
    There are bargains to be had!!
    I too am a Tektronix fan, I do have a Rigol DS1202 Z-E and I like it, still learning all the functions on that.
    I have a couple of rebuilds a couple of 2465’s, a 2215, and a 2246…I’m awaiting delivery of a donor 2215, I’m wondering if my luck will hold out on that one??

  • I seem to have got addicted the last few months Kerry.
    In the early 70’s a built a Heathkit scope, RF generator and multimeter, I never found the time to learn how to use the scope due to working for a living, most of lt seven days a week. When I left the UK, I had to leave them behind. Out of Nostalgia, I bought the same model scope, RF gen, and multimeter off Ebay at good prices. The scope and RF gen need recapping, although they do work. The multimeter used a mercury battery for the bias circuit in the ohms range, I intend to replace it with a voltage regulator and associated components.
    Electronics is getting addictive!!!!

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