Posts tagged ‘74HC595’

A DIY Vacuum Fluorescent Display Driver

In my previous post, I showed a simple vacuum fluorescent display filament driver built using a 555 timer and a custom hand-wound, center-tapped toroidal pulse transformer. And as promised in my earlier comment, I am going to show you the remainder of the VFD driving circuit here. Continue reading ‘A DIY Vacuum Fluorescent Display Driver’ »

Interfacing DS3232 RTC With MSP430G2452

I have used DS3232 RTC (real-time clock) in many Arduino based projects before. DS3232 utilizes a temperature compensated oscillator, which makes it far more accurate than devices like DS1307. In this blog post, I will give some code examples on implementing a digital clock using DS3232 and the TI MSP430 Launchpad. Continue reading ‘Interfacing DS3232 RTC With MSP430G2452’ »

Digital Metronome — Revisited

Last year, I wrote about a simple digital metronome project. While the device worked pretty well there are a few changes that are to be desired. Continue reading ‘Digital Metronome — Revisited’ »

An 8-Digit 7 Segment Display

I built a 4-digit 7 segment display last year. In that design, I used four 74HC595 shift registers to drive the four individual 7 segment displays, with one for each digit. So when I wanted to build an 8-digit display, I thought about using the same design with eight 74HC595s at first. But it seemed that the soldering would be a lot more challenging on the prototype board as there will be 8 chips and 64 resistors to solder. Continue reading ‘An 8-Digit 7 Segment Display’ »

4 Digit 7 Segment Display Using Arduino

I was inspired by Paul’s 7 segment display and decided to build one myself. He used 4 common cathode 7 segment displays. In his original schematics, all the segments within a display shared one current limiting resistor which unfortunately affect the display brightness when different numbers of segments are lit. I happened to have two common anode dual 7 segment displays (QDSP-G545) so I decided to use them and four 74HC595 shift registers to build a four 7-seg display. Realizing that other people might be using either common anode or common cathode displays, I also built a library that can be used for either case. Continue reading ‘4 Digit 7 Segment Display Using Arduino’ »