Posts tagged ‘C++’

MCP2210 Library Reference

I have created a dedicated page for the MCP2210 library documentations. An link to the reference can also be found on the side navigation pane. The Doxygen generated project documentation can be viewed directly here. Continue reading ‘MCP2210 Library Reference’ »

MCP2210 Library — MCP3204 SPI ADC

During the past few weeks, I have shown many examples (see 1, 2, 3, 4) of using the open source MCP2210 Library with SPI devices under Linux. In this post, I will conclude this series with one more example: interfacing MCP3204 with MCP2210. With this example, I will have covered all the devices included on the evaluation board, which represents most of the scenarios you will run into. Other SPI devices can be controlled similarly using the methods illustrated in this series. Continue reading ‘MCP2210 Library — MCP3204 SPI ADC’ »

MCP2210 Library — SPI EEPROM

So far, I have shown examples of using the open source MCP2210 library with MCP2210 GPIO, MCP23S08 and TC77 temperature sensor. In this post, I will show an example of interfacing the chip with an SPI EEPROM using the library. Continue reading ‘MCP2210 Library — SPI EEPROM’ »

MCP2210 Library — SPI Example Using TC77

A couple of weeks ago, I showed an example of using the open source MCP2210 Library I created earlier to communicate with the MCP23S08 port expander under Linux. In this post, I will provide another example of using the library with the TC77 temperature sensor included on the MCP2210 evaluation board. Continue reading ‘MCP2210 Library — SPI Example Using TC77’ »

MCP2210 Library — SPI Example Using MCP23S08

I made a few minor tweaks to the open source MCP2210 library during the past few days, and had also updated the documentation. In my previous post, I illustrated how to manipulate the GPIO pins using this library and today I will show you an example of communicating with a MCP23S08 8 bit IO port expander using SPI. Continue reading ‘MCP2210 Library — SPI Example Using MCP23S08’ »

MCP2210 Library

After a couple of weeks’ coding and testing, I finally finished the initial version of the MCP2210 C++ library for Linux. This library utilizes functions from Signal 11‘s HID API (hidraw) to communicate over the USB HID interface. Continue reading ‘MCP2210 Library’ »

AD7705/AD7706 Library Revisited

About a year ago, I wrote a simple library for interfacing AD7705/AD7706 with Arduino. The library works, but it requires some decent knowledge of the underlying chip, which had made it somewhat difficult to use. Most issues users reported can be resolved by adjusting the timing in user code, but I admit that it is somewhat difficult for users who are not familiar with the chip. For a library, I should have made it easier to use to begin with. So, I decided to add a few long-awaited features and hopefully these tweaks will make the library easier to use. Continue reading ‘AD7705/AD7706 Library Revisited’ »

Makefile for Arduino 1.0

A while back, I created an Arduino plugin for NetBeans so that I could use the full-fledged NetBeans IDE for all my Arduino projects. The approach I took was using the NetBeans project sample module method. Under the hood though, it is nothing more than a makefile and an source file template. Continue reading ‘Makefile for Arduino 1.0’ »

Building an Auxiliary Display

I wanted to be able to check my web server’s statistics periodically but did not want having to log on ever time when I wanted to do so. The simplest way to achieve this is to have the computer monitor on and run a server statistics program that outputs the information onto the screen. Continue reading ‘Building an Auxiliary Display’ »

An 8-Digit 7 Segment Display

I built a 4-digit 7 segment display last year. In that design, I used four 74HC595 shift registers to drive the four individual 7 segment displays, with one for each digit. So when I wanted to build an 8-digit display, I thought about using the same design with eight 74HC595s at first. But it seemed that the soldering would be a lot more challenging on the prototype board as there will be 8 chips and 64 resistors to solder. Continue reading ‘An 8-Digit 7 Segment Display’ »

AD7705/AD7706 Library

AD7705 and AD7706 are two 16-bit Sigma Delta ADCs. Equipped with on-chip digital filters and programmable gain front ends, these chips are ideal for low frequency multi-channel signal measurements. The main difference between AD7705 and AD7706 is that AD7705 has two fully differential input channels while AD7706 has three pseudo differential input channels. Continue reading ‘AD7705/AD7706 Library’ »

4KHz-170MHz Wide Band RF Signal Generator – II

Continue with my previous article, let me first explain the code a little bit. Continue reading ‘4KHz-170MHz Wide Band RF Signal Generator – II’ »

A Clock/Stop Watch Based on BQ3287

Over the past couple of weeks, I have been experimenting with BQ3287, a real time clock module from Taxes Instruments. My ultimate goal was to eventually create a full fledged control platform based on this RTC module (more on this later). But first and foremost, I would like to explore its capabilities as an accurate time keeper. Continue reading ‘A Clock/Stop Watch Based on BQ3287’ »

Arduino Development Using NetBeans

The Arduino development environment is probably the preferred development platform for the majority of Arduino users. It is lean and relatively easy to use. Quite a few examples are at your finger tip and even for people without much programming experience, it is relatively easy to get started. You can write and upload your sketches (programs) without the need to ever leave the IDE. Continue reading ‘Arduino Development Using NetBeans’ »

Working With LM19 Temperature Sensor

LM19 is an analog temperature sensor that operates over a while temperature range (-55 to 130 Celsius). It is very easy to interface it with a microcontroller due to is fairly linear voltage output. Continue reading ‘Working With LM19 Temperature Sensor’ »