Posts tagged ‘Arduino Due’

Building a Single Pixel Scanner

A flat bed scanner typically uses three rows of CCD sensors (RGB) to capture images placed directly on top of the glass bed. When the CCD array scans from one end of the image to the other, the digitized color image is formed. So with a similar approach, we could use just one photosensitive device to capture the entire image one pixel at a time via raster scanning. Now that I have an HP 7044A X-Y recorder I could use it’s X/Y servo mechanism with a suitable sensor to build a single pixel scanner. Continue reading ‘Building a Single Pixel Scanner’ »

HP 7044A X-Y Recorder Teardown, Lorenz Attractor

I picked up an HP 7044A X-Y recorder on eBay recently. This one was made in the early 1980’s and by today’s technology standard it is rather ancient. And because of this, it is very easy to interface with as the input is completely analog. My plan was to do some experiments down the road using the X-Y movements capability of this HP recorder. Continue reading ‘HP 7044A X-Y Recorder Teardown, Lorenz Attractor’ »

Turn Your Android Phone into a Wireless Touchpad

In this blog post, I will show you a simple way of turning your Android phone into a wireless touchpad. For this to work all you need is your Android phone, an Arduino board and a HC-06 (or HC-05) bluetooth module based on BC417. A short demonstration video is included towards the end of the post. Continue reading ‘Turn Your Android Phone into a Wireless Touchpad’ »

Using Arduino Due’s True Random Number Generator

Arduino Due uses an Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU, which has a native hardware based True Random Number Generator (TRNG). In this post, we will take a brief look at how to use it in the Arduino environment and take a look at some of its statistical characteristics. Continue reading ‘Using Arduino Due’s True Random Number Generator’ »

On Arduino Due PWM Frequency

I just got myself a couple of Arduino Due boards. While they were released almost two years ago, I have not really got a chance to look at these until quite recently. Arduino Due is based on Atmel’s ATSAM3x8E 32-bit ARM Cortext-M3 processor. The processor core runs at 84 MHz, which is significantly faster than its 8-bit AVR counterpart ATmega328p which runs at 16 MHz. For an ATmega328p, the highest achievable PWM frequency is 8Mhz (square wave), so we should be able to generate much higher frequency signals on an Arduino Due. But how high can we go? Let’s find out. Continue reading ‘On Arduino Due PWM Frequency’ »