Posts tagged ‘Reverse Engineering’

Reverse Engineering of BK Precision 1696 Switching Power Supply’s LCD Protocol

As mentioned in my previous post, besides the broken LCD there was also an issue with the power supply portion of the unit and the output voltage was clamped at around 10 to 11V. The digital circuitry portion however seemed to be intact. Unfortunately since an identical LCD is virtually unobtanium, I thought I’d reverse engineer the LCD protocol so once the power supply is fixed I can fix the display by hooking up a different LCD. Continue reading ‘Reverse Engineering of BK Precision 1696 Switching Power Supply’s LCD Protocol’ »

Reverse Engineering a Uniden Cordlessphone LCD

I recently upgraded my home phone system and thus was left with a couple of old Uniden DCT648-2 handsets. Most of the components inside are probably not salvageable but these handsets use 3×16 character LCDs, so it would be nice if I could reuse them in my other projects. Continue reading ‘Reverse Engineering a Uniden Cordlessphone LCD’ »

Reverse Engineering a Wavetek OCXO Board

I bought a Wavetek OCXO board a long while ago. My original plan was to remove the onboard crystal oven to replace the broken OCXO in my HP 5350B. But since I later managed to fix the original OCXO , this board had been sitting quietly in one of my component bins collecting dust. Continue reading ‘Reverse Engineering a Wavetek OCXO Board’ »

Reverse Engineering a Beseler PM2L Color Analyzer

I recently acquired an old Beseler PM2L color analyzer. This kind of color analyzer was designed to analyze the color or exposure of film negatives at a certain location by comparing the intensity of the filtered light of each color channel (CMY and white). The PM2L model was made in the 70’s through early 80’s and has long become obsolete. But since it has a 931A photomultiplier tube (PMT) inside, you can easily repurpose it for other uses. And the good news is, these old color analyzers are cheap on eBay. You can usually grab one for a price cheaper than a bare PMT itself. Continue reading ‘Reverse Engineering a Beseler PM2L Color Analyzer’ »

Reverse Engineering the Syma S107G IR Protocol

I got a Syma S107G IR controlled helicopter for my son a while ago. This tiny remote control helicopter is a rather amazing toy. Not only its movement is very stable, but the rotor speed, forward backward movements and turning can be all proportionally controlled as well. I thought it might be interesting to take a look at its control protocol to see how things are done. And yes, I do have a video at the very end showing controlling the S107G using the reverse engineered remote control. Continue reading ‘Reverse Engineering the Syma S107G IR Protocol’ »