Posts tagged ‘Arduino’

Digital Metronome — Revisited

Last year, I wrote about a simple digital metronome project. While the device worked pretty well there are a few changes that are to be desired. Continue reading ‘Digital Metronome — Revisited’ »

Simple Zener Diode Tester

In this post I will show you a simple Zenner diode tester circuit, when coupled with a PWM generator it can be used to measure the breakdown voltage of Zener diodes. Or more generically, it can be used to measure the breakdown voltages (e.g. BVceo, BVcbo) of BTJ transistors. Continue reading ‘Simple Zener Diode Tester’ »

Arduino Library For MCP342X

Last time, I discussed how to interface TI’s ADS1112 16-bit delta-sigma A/D converter with Arduino. Today I am going to introduce you to a set of easy-to-program A/D chips from Microchip. MCP3246/7/8 are a family of 16-bit Delta-Sigma A/D converters with an I2C interface. MCP3426 and MCP3427 both have two differential input channels, while MCP3429 has four differential input channels. The programming for all three devices are essentially the same, except for the number of available channels. Continue reading ‘Arduino Library For MCP342X’ »

Interfacing ADS1112 With Arduino

ADS1112 is a 16-bit delta-sigma A/D converter. This A/D chip has an I2C interface, a 2.048V internal voltage reference and performs a self-calibration on each conversion. These characteristics make it very easy to work with an MCU such as ATmega328p. Continue reading ‘Interfacing ADS1112 With Arduino’ »

AD7705/AD7706 Library Revisited

About a year ago, I wrote a simple library for interfacing AD7705/AD7706 with Arduino. The library works, but it requires some decent knowledge of the underlying chip, which had made it somewhat difficult to use. Most issues users reported can be resolved by adjusting the timing in user code, but I admit that it is somewhat difficult for users who are not familiar with the chip. For a library, I should have made it easier to use to begin with. So, I decided to add a few long-awaited features and hopefully these tweaks will make the library easier to use. Continue reading ‘AD7705/AD7706 Library Revisited’ »

A Self-Balancing Robot – III

In part one, I went over the theory behind the self-balancing robot and in part two, I showed you my build using a modified toy truck. In this post, I will walk you through the code and show you the finished balancing robot. If you are impatient, you can scroll to the end for the demostration video and the source code. Continue reading ‘A Self-Balancing Robot – III’ »

A Self-Balancing Robot – II

In my previous post, I explained the theory behind the self-balancing robot at a high level. Here, I will discuss the actual build in more details. Continue reading ‘A Self-Balancing Robot – II’ »

A Self-Balancing Robot – I

Building a self-balancing robot is one of those things that every hobbyist and engineer want to do. But there are a few hurdles for a lot of people. There is the theory on the one hand and then there is the mechanics on the other. In this and the next few posts, I will show you a self-balancing robot I recently built and will explain in details on some of the most important aspects. Continue reading ‘A Self-Balancing Robot – I’ »

So Why I like Arduino

You probably know this already from just reading some of the posts in my blog. Like millions of others, I am a big Arduino fan. So I thought I would share my side of the story and you can decide for yourself. Continue reading ‘So Why I like Arduino’ »

Adding Off-Screen Buffer to Serial LCD Display

Since the current Arduino tools do not support in-circuit debugging, you will have to rely heavily on the serial print outs when tracking down those hard-to-find bugs unless you are one of those few elites whose code just works 100% every time. It is all good when you are doing your development when a computer is readily available. But what if you need to capture the outputs when you do not have the access to a computer? I found myself running into this situation quite often. Continue reading ‘Adding Off-Screen Buffer to Serial LCD Display’ »

Using FRAM as Nonvolatile Memory With Arduino

One of the biggest advantages of FRAM (or FeRAM, Ferroelectric RAM) over EEPROM is that FRAM has a much higher write speed and typically can operate at bus speed. This means that no delay instructions are needed when performing write operations, which greatly reduces coding complexity and increases the overall throughput. Continue reading ‘Using FRAM as Nonvolatile Memory With Arduino’ »

Interfacing MMA8453Q With Arduino

MMA8453Q is a rather inexpensive accelerometer. It is significantly cheaper than many other 3-axis accelerometers (such as the popular LIS3LV02DL) and yet it offers a reasonably high 10 bits resolution and packs a rich set of features that simplifies designs and programming in many different applications. Continue reading ‘Interfacing MMA8453Q With Arduino’ »

Makefile for Arduino 1.0

A while back, I created an Arduino plugin for NetBeans so that I could use the full-fledged NetBeans IDE for all my Arduino projects. The approach I took was using the NetBeans project sample module method. Under the hood though, it is nothing more than a makefile and an source file template. Continue reading ‘Makefile for Arduino 1.0’ »

Building a Wireless Temperature Sensor

I have built quite a few (1,2,3) temperature measurement circuits in the past, but none of those has remote sensing capability. So I decided to make a wireless temperature sensor so that temperature measurements can be made anywhere within the range of the transmitter and the receiver. Continue reading ‘Building a Wireless Temperature Sensor’ »

Interfacing DS28EC20 with Arduino

DS28EC20 is a 20Kb 1-Wire EEPROM chip from Maxim. Like all other 1-wire devices, only a single pin is needed for both power and communication. In this blog posting, I will show you how to how to communicate with DS28EC20 using the popular Arduino platform. Continue reading ‘Interfacing DS28EC20 with Arduino’ »